New silk wall exhibition at The Gallery examines Israeli West Bank Wall

Published: 
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Beginning Nov. 11, SPSCC will welcome Eun-Kyung Suh to The Gallery at the Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts for “Stay”. Suh is a Full Professor of 3D Art at the University of Minnesota, Duluth.

Suh’s work explores the historical and modern meanings of wall – a continuous vertical brick or stone structure that closes or divides and area of land. Suh’s silk walls include transferred maps of areas and lost homes along the Green Line of the Israeli West Bank Wall.

“I hope to symbolize the lost lives of the people affected by this arbitrary configuration,” stated Suh.

The exhibit will be open to the public through Dec. 13, and a special opening exhibition and artist talk will take place Nov. 15 from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Admission is free.

The Gallery is open Mondays through Fridays from noon to 6 p.m.

Statement from artist Eun-Kyung Suh

I have been investigating the meaning of a wall in the context of the current political crisis.

By definition, a wall is a continuous vertical brick or stone structure that encloses or divides an area of land. Until the 20th century, a wall often acted as a fortification system to protect and consolidate territories against neighboring political entities. It provides the insiders with security, shelter, or defense from the outsiders. In the modern historical era, a wall evokes multiple simultaneous emotions and connotations. A wall divides regions or countries not only physically but also ideologically or prevents the influx of people from one country to another.

For the exhibition at the gallery, I borrowed the idea of the Israeli West Bank Wall, which was built on the West Bank and along the Green Line. The Israeli government regards it a security barrier against violent uprisings whereas the Palestinians call it an apartheid wall. By creating diaphanous silk walls and transferring the maps of areas and lost homes along the Green Line onto them, I hope to symbolize the lost lives of the people affected by this arbitrary configuration.

White silk with cutouts in arrangement
Photo provided by Eun-Kyung Suh